The menu of a restaurant is its most powerful draw. Restaurants must make an attractive catering menu that offers fresh and trustworthy food and drink alternatives in order to build a loyal customer base.

According to a Harris Poll poll, 85 percent of Americans mention food quality as a major factor in restaurant selection, while 69 percent cite pricing as a major factor. This suggests that the majority of diners regard the kind, value, and quality of food to be the most important factors in picking where to eat.

How to Make a Restaurant Menu from the Ground Up

Keep the restaurant’s concept in mind.

Taking a step back and realizing the business’s desired idea is the first step in developing a restaurant menu using the menu creator. To begin, a restaurant should concentrate on executing a few things really well.

A new pizzeria, for example, should concentrate its efforts on obtaining high-quality pizza materials, developing original pizza recipes and topping combinations, and obtaining the required kitchen equipment to prepare flawless pizzas.

After that, the pizzeria may concentrate on two more areas: supplements and tradeoffs. Restaurants should provide a variety of meals to complement their main menu. Salads, sandwiches, and pasta meals could be included in a pizzeria’s menu.

Dissect the Menu into Sections

It’s simple to organize different foods into sections on the menu once the restaurant decides where to focus its offer. For example, a high-end steakhouse may construct menu buckets for:

– Starters and Apps

– Salads and soups

– Chicken Main Dishes

– Entrees de Steak

– Seafood Main Courses

– Pasta Dishes

– Condiments

Restaurant Menu

There are two approaches to this stage. To begin, consider which of these areas a restaurant’s ideal menu would have, and then add specific items to them. The other option is to look at the meals that will be served in the restaurant, categorize them, and then build up sections from there.

Take Into Account Food Allergies and Dietary Restrictions

While focusing on the most important menu items is important, restaurants must also ensure that no one is left out. A pescatarian should be able to find something appealing on a steakhouse menu, while a vegetarian should be able to do the same in a seafood restaurant. Some visitors may be on a strict diet, such as keto or paleo, and making every menu item inedible for them might result in the loss of that guest, as well as any friends or family members who are eating with them.

Decide on price points

It’s difficult to price a restaurant menu because you don’t want to frighten away customers, but you also don’t want to put the restaurant out of business. Food costs, on average, are roughly 25-30% of the menu price — although this varies. It’s very unusual for pasta dishes and desserts to have far greater markups than the rest of the menu.

Create a menu

Restaurant Menu

After you’ve completed all of your planning, it’s time to construct the restaurant’s customer-facing menu. Menu engineering, or the act of studying and intentionally creating a menu for optimal profitability, comes into play in this situation. Restaurants use established psychological techniques to bring attention to their most popular menu items. The visual style of the menu, as well as the explanations for each item, are among them.

The menu should be uploaded to the restaurant’s website

Menus should be uploaded to the restaurant’s website after they’re finished so that visitors may easily view them. Because 77% of guests check a restaurant’s website before going, this is an important marketing strategy for the modern restaurant.

Furthermore, putting the restaurant’s menu online allows for digital on-site ordering and payment. Guests may use smartphones to peruse the menu, place orders, and — when they’re done – pay the bill online, which is sometimes triggered by a QR code on their table.